Skip to main content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

Halloween: Day of the Dead

This LibGuide has been created to lead you to resources on Halloween or to resources on Halloween-related topics. This Halloween LibGuide can be used for leisure interests as well as more scholarly research.

Books

Día de los Muertos

The Day of the Dead is a “Spanish  Día de los Muertos  holiday in Mexico, also observed to a lesser extent in other areas of Latin America and in the United States, honouring dead loved ones and making peace with the eventuality of death by treating it familiarly, without fear and dread. The holiday is derived from the rituals of the pre-Hispanic peoples of Mexico. Led by the goddess Mictecacihuatl, known as “Lady of the Dead,” the celebration lasted a month. After the Spanish arrived in Mexico and began converting the native peoples to Roman Catholicism, the holiday was moved to coincide with All Saints' Day and All Souls' Day (November 1 and 2, respectively). 

 

Modern observations vary from region to region. In some rural areas, families adorn grave sites with candles, marigolds, and the favorite foods of deceased relatives in an attempt to persuade the loved ones to return for a family reunion. In urban areas, people take to the street for festive celebrations and indulge in the consumption of food and alcohol. Some wear wooden skull masks known as calacas. Many families build altars, called ofrendas, in their homes, using photos, candles, flowers, and food. The festivities are often characterized by black humour. Toys and food, including breads and candies, are created in the shape of symbols of death such as skulls and skeletons.” -- from Encyclopedia Britannica Online Reference Center

Web Sites

Day of the Dead (Dia de los Muertos) Trailer