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Aboriginal Medicine: Home

This LibGuide was created to meet the requirements of the Huntingdon College Australia travel seminar INDP 372D, spring 2012.

Aboriginal Traditional Healing

Aboriginal people used a range of remedies – wild herbs, animal products, steam baths, clay pits, charcoal and mud, massages, string amulets and secret chants and ceremonies.Some of these remedies had no empirical basis, but it is clear from the accounts of colonists that they worked. Many of the remedies worked by healing directly through their chemical or physical action. Aromatic herbs, tannin-rich inner barks and kinos have well documented therapeutic effects. Other plants undoubtedly harboured alkaloids or other compounds with healing effects. Aboriginal remedies varied between clans and in different parts of the country. There was no single set of Aboriginal medicines and remedies, just as there was no one Aboriginal language.

Where The Medicine Comes From

Welcome

I was raised in New Mexico where there is a strong influence of Native American people.  I remember hearing about witch doctors and their natural remedies for healing.  I never thought much more about the background until going to Australia.  As a premed student my interest has increased.

Aboriginal Medicine

Traditional Medicine of Aboriginal Australia

                                                                                                    

Pictures

   

Australian Aboriginal healers Djerrkngu Marika (L) and Babalangua Munungurr of the Yolngu clan prepare a fire with bush medicines, as part a spiritual healing which will be performed at the Healing Place at Nhulunbuy, approximately 690 km (429 miles) east of Darwin July 16, 2007. The Healing Place is a project of the Yothu Yindi Foundation, and is currently on a six month trial period. 

Australian Aboriginal healers of the Yolngu clan rub ancient bush medicines and perform a spiritual healing on clan Elder, Gungulu Munugurr, at the Healing Place at Nhulunbuy, approximately 690 km (429 miles) east of Darwin July 16, 2007. The Healing Place is a project of the Yothu Yindi Foundation, and is currently on a six month trial period. 


Student Researcher

Medicine Man

ABORIGINAL CURES Wiles of die Medicine Man A medicine man belonging to an aboriginal tribe near Cooper's Creek has performed some queer cures. When his patients were not relieved by clay pills, infusions, or massaging, he would re sort to his favorite faith cure. - He would suck -the affected part, pretending to extractFix this text a stone, which he had previously placed In his mouth. The blacks believed In magic, and were convinced that the pain had been re moved. ' .'...- ?